In The Frame
In The Frame
In The Frame

Solange’s take on black identity via Tate.org

by The Art Newspaper  |  26 August 2017
Solange’s take on black identity via Tate.org
Solange Knowles (courtesy SFMoMA)

The superstar singer Solange Knowles Ferguson, sister of Beyoncé, reflects on black identity and womanhood in a striking new online interactive piece available on the Tate website. As part of the digital dossier, entitled Seventy States, Solange discusses what drove her recent album, A Seat at the Table, musing also on the significance of the Tate Modern show Soul of a Nation, Art in the Age of Black Power (until 22 October) and why artist Betye Saar, a pioneer of the Black Arts movement, matters. She writes online: “There would be no hesitation should I be asked to describe myself today. I am a Black woman. A woman yes, but a Black woman first and last. Black womanhood has been at the root of my entire existence since birth.” The intriguing digital composition includes a piece titled we sleep in our clothes, (because we're warriors of the night) (2017), created at Tate Modern and featuring the work Capsules (NBPx me-you) (2010) by Ricardo Basbaum. Go to: http://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/exhibition/soul-nation-art-age-black-power/solange-knowl...

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